Presentations

Audience: Everyone
Topic: General

Visibility into your applications and systems is critical to guard against errors, maintain uptime and protect performance. But with the number of monitoring services and projects growing into the hundreds, how do you ensure full coverage and identify blind spots?

Audience: Everyone

Increasingly companies are part of the open source ecosystem, starting new projects and contributing to projects.  And community members often feel that open source is becoming more commercial and driven by companies.  How can we learn to work together and coexist?  What can we do to increase our understanding of each other and find common ground and bridges?  Come, discuss with me how we can support the continued healthy evolution and momentum of open source.  

Audience: Intermediate
Topic: Kernel

cgroup (control group) is a Linux kernel mechanism to hierarchically organize processes and distribute resources along the hierarchy. cgroup v2 has various improvements over v1 in how resources are tracked and controlled. This session looks at how the major resources are handled in cgroup v2.

Audience: Everyone
Topic: Entertainment

With over 2 million views, "Linux Sucks" is one of the most watched video series in Linux history. And it's time to bring the train into the station. This is the biggest, craziest -- and last -- "Linux Sucks" event. Seriously. This is it. The last one. Ever.

Audience: Everyone
Topic: Keynote

With the state of US and global politics, many in our communities are becoming galvanized to fight for what they believe is right in the world. But does software freedom even fit into that context? And if so, how?

In this talk, Karen will talk about the overall place for free and open source software relative to the important social issues of today. She will discuss how to frame the work of free software in a way that is useful and supportive of greater social good.

Audience: Everyone

After 18 years of Open Source Programs Offices in some of the biggest tech companies, this might seem like a dead-end topic.  There are only so many things your OSPO needs to do, right? WRONG!!!  

A well-run OSPO will challenge your status quo and push compelling Change Agency.  Learn how creativity and innovation in your OSPO practice can create change both in and outside of your company, with examples and stories from the first OSPO owner at Sun Microsystems, and the current OSPO Manager at PayPal.

Audience: Everyone

After 18 years of Open Source Programs Offices in some of the biggest tech companies, this might seem like a dead-end topic.  There are only so many things your OSPO needs to do, right? WRONG!!!  

A well-run OSPO will challenge your status quo and push compelling Change Agency.  Learn how creativity and innovation in your OSPO practice can create change both in and outside of your company, with examples and stories from the first OSPO owner at Sun Microsystems, and the current OSPO Manager at PayPal.

Audience: Intermediate
Topic: General

To understand how Qubes secures your desktop, look to your pantry. The same security by compartmentalization concept that makes Qubes resilient against attack was conceived of over two hundred years ago to protect food against infection.

In this talk Kyle will discuss how to jam strawberries, can green beans, and isolate desktop workflows into a combination of netVMs, proxyVMs, and appVMs. He’ll cover some common threats against your food and data and describe how Mason jars and Qubes can mitigate them.

Audience: Everyone
Topic: SysAdmin

BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter) has been enhanced in the Linux 4.x series and now powers a large collection of performance analysis and observability tools ready for you to use, included in the bcc (BPF Complier Collection) open source project. BPF nowadays can do system tracing, software defined networks, and kernel fast path: much more than just filtering packets! 

Audience: Intermediate
Topic: Embedded

What happens between the push of a power button and the login prompt? PID 1 has been the focus of controversy, but the kernel performs complex work before userspace even starts: probing devices, allocating memory, and starting per-CPU threads. Kernel actions are sequenced via a series of 'initcall' stages. What is the difference between a 'bootloader' and a BIOS? Why do devices show multiple different boot animations and screen resolutions? Why should an ordinary user care about 'verified boot'? Containers that rely on the host's kernel have a different approach to start-up.